Art, journalism and local surveillance collide in ‘eyes on oakland escoliosis lumbar de convexidad derecha’ reveal

A joint project between the Port of Oakland and the city, the Domain Awareness Center was intended to create a network of sensors and cameras to secure the port, but it ballooned in scope to a citywide surveillance center that would merge closed-circuit television footage, gunshot detectors, license-plate readers, social media feeds estenosis lumbar cirugia and more into a centralized facility.

But facing intense opposition from privacy advocates and local residents, the Oakland City Council voted in March 2014 to dramatically scale back the Domain Awareness Center and dolor lumbar izquierdo cadera limit its use to the port and Oakland International Airport, and it ordered the creation of a privacy policy for the system.


You can read the draft policy, which is open for public comment, here.

Our installation aims to appropriate the concept and imagery of the Domain Awareness Center, using it as a space to learn about surveillance, rather than a place to be monitored. The piece will feature six screens showcasing a variety of surveillance-related material, including audio, video and photo responses from our interviews with residents; footage from closed-circuit television cameras around downtown Oakland; social media contributions; and more. Why are we doing this?

The nature of surveillance technology often is cloaked in secrecy, and many tools are procured and deployed by local municipalities and police departments with little public notice or debate. The proposal for the citywide Domain estenosis lumbar soluciones Awareness Center originally was listed in July 2013 as an item on the City Council’s consent calendar – generally reserved for noncontroversial items – until activists noticed it and began rallying opposition.

While the Domain Awareness Center has causas del dolor lumbar parte baja espalda been reduced in scope, the various technologies it would incorporate still are used across the city and collect information on many Oaklanders, regardless of whether they’ve committed a crime. This exhibit is intended to build on the debate sparked by the Domain Awareness Center, exploring the tug-of-war between privacy and public safety.

We want “Eyes on Oakland” to be an opportunity to discuss the types of data that police collect, why they’re collected, how they’re used and stored, and who has access. And we want escoliosis dorsal izquierda to take the information beyond the walls of City Hall and directly into Oakland’s neighborhoods, putting information into residents’ hands and hearing what they have to say.

This story was originally published by Reveal from The Center for Investigative Reporting, a nonprofit news organization based in the San Francisco Bay Area. Learn more at revealnews.org and subscribe to the Reveal podcast, produced with PRX escoliosis lumbar consecuencias, at revealnews.org/podcast.In The Center for Investigative Reporting’s ongoing experiments at the intersection of art, investigative journalism and community engagement, we’re about to present our work to two new venues: the Oakland Museum of California and a Ford Falcon van.

A joint project between the Port of Oakland and the city, the Domain Awareness Center was intended to create a network of sensors and cameras to secure the port, but it ballooned in scope to a citywide surveillance center that would merge closed-circuit television footage, gunshot detectors, license-plate readers, social media feeds and more into a centralized facility.

But facing intense opposition from privacy advocates and local residents, the Oakland City Council voted in March 2014 to dramatically scale back the Domain Awareness Center and limit its hernia de disco lumbar use to the port and Oakland International Airport, and it ordered the creation of a privacy policy for the system. You can read the draft policy, which is open for public comment, here.

Our columna vertebral lumbar installation aims to appropriate the concept and imagery of the Domain Awareness Center, using it as a space to learn about surveillance, rather than a place to be monitored. The piece will feature six screens showcasing a variety of surveillance-related material, including audio, video and photo responses from our interviews with residents; footage from closed-circuit television cameras around downtown Oakland; social media contributions; and more.

The nature of surveillance technology often is cloaked in secrecy, and many tools are procured and deployed escoliosis lumbar dextroconvexa by local municipalities and police departments with little public notice or debate. The proposal for the citywide Domain Awareness Center originally was listed in July 2013 as an item on the City Council’s consent calendar – generally reserved for noncontroversial items – until activists noticed it and began rallying opposition.

While the Domain Awareness Center has been reduced in scope, the various technologies it would incorporate still are used across the city and collect information on many Oaklanders, regardless of whether they’ve committed a crime. This exhibit is intended to build on the debate sparked escoliosis cervical sintomas by the Domain Awareness Center, exploring the tug-of-war between privacy and public safety.

We want “Eyes on Oakland” to be an opportunity to discuss the types of data that police collect, why they’re collected, how they’re used and stored, and who has access. And we want to take the information beyond the walls of City Hall and directly into Oakland’s neighborhoods, putting information into residents’ hands and hearing what they have to say.

Meet us at the “Eyes on Oakland” van. For the next three months, we’ll take our van to locations across the city to display and distribute information about surveillance technology and get feedback from residents dolor lumbar ejercicios. We’ll incorporate audio, video and photos that we collect (with your permission, of course) into the exhibit during its run at the Oakland Museum. You can find out where to find the van by following us on Twitter: @EyesOnOak.