Arthritis, osteoporosis, and chronic back conditions healthy people 2020 escoliosis lumbar izquierda

These resources are based on rigorous evidence. Resources with this rating include systematic reviews of published intervention evaluations or studies that have evidence of effectiveness, feasibility, reach, sustainability, and transferability.

These resources are based on strong evidence. Resources with this rating escoliosis leve include non-systematic reviews of published intervention evaluations or studies that have evidence of effectiveness, feasibility, reach, sustainability, and transferability.

Systematic Review : A systematic review is a critical assessment and evaluation of all research studies that address a particular issue. Researchers use an organized method enfermedades lumbares of locating, assembling, and evaluating a body of literature on a particular topic using a set of specific criteria.


A systematic review typically includes a description of the findings of the collection of research studies. The systematic review may or may not include escoliosis dorsolumbar dextroconvexa a quantitative pooling of data, called a meta-analysis.

Nonsystematic Review: A non-systematic review is a critical assessment and evaluation of some but not all research studies that address a particular issue. Researchers do not dolor lumbar derecho use an organized method of locating, assembling, and evaluating a body of literature on a particular topic, possibly using a set of specific criteria. A non-systematic review typically includes a description of the findings of the collection of research studies. The non-systematic review may or may not include a quantitative pooling of data, called a meta-analysis.

Cohort Study: A cohort study is a clinical research study in which people who presently have a certain condition or receive a particular treatment dolor lumbar embarazo primeras semanas are followed over time and compared with another group of people who are not affected by the condition.

Cross-Sectional or Prevalence Study: A cross-sectional or prevalence dolor lumbar cie 10 study is a study that examines how often or how frequently a disease or condition occurs in a group of people. Prevalence is calculated by dividing the number of people who have the disease or condition by the total number of people in the group.

Case-Control Study: A case-control study identifies all incident cases that hernia lumbar cie 10 develop the outcome of interest and compares their exposure history with the exposure history of controls sampled at random from everyone within the cohort who is still at risk for developing the outcome of interest.

Expert Opinion: The opinion of someone widely recognized as a reliable source of knowledge, technique, or skill whose faculty for judging or deciding rightly, justly, or wisely is accorded authority and status by their peers or the public in a specific well-distinguished domain.

Topic Areas are dimmed in the dropdown menus to indicate that there are no resources dolor lumbar embarazo available in the database at the time of your search. The same is true for specific search criteria, such as age ranges. We are continually adding evidence-based resources escoliosis dextroconvexa to the database. As resources become available, you will have the opportunity to choose from more Topic Areas, objectives, and search criteria.

Subject matter experts at the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services who comprise the Healthy
People 2020 Workgroup Coordinators for the relevant Healthy People 2020 Topic Area. The list of Healthy People Topic Areas can be found here . The list escoliosis dorsolumbar izquierda of Healthy People Workgroup Coordinators can be found here .

The ratings were developed to identify evidence-based resources and interventions that may be used to achieve targets set forth in Healthy People 2020. The Healthy People 2020 evidence-based resource tool is managed by the Office of Disease Prevention and Health Promotion at the U.S. Department of Health and dolor lumbar izquierdo Human Services and supported, in part, by funds from the National Institutes of Health’s Office of Disease Prevention.