Basi operacion de columna lumbar recuperacion

Pilates can positively aid in post surgery rehabilitation. I am a 37 year old female who carries the BRCA1 gene mutation. BRCA stands for breast cancer susceptibility gene. This genetic mutation puts me at great risk for getting breast, ovarian, and other kinds of cancers at a young age. With the knowledge of my gene mutation and strong family history of cancer I made the choice to undergo prophylactic bilateral mastectomy followed by expander to implant reconstruction. This choice meant enduring two separate surgeries within a 4 month period. Being an active, fit and current pilates student I had confidence that I could recover and use pilates to rehabilitate my upper body. A year prior to surgery I started the BASI comprehensive training program.


The knowledge I acquired through the training process gave me the confidence to know that I could safely and effectively rehabilitate myself after surgery. I am the type person who learns by doing. By using myself as the case study I was able to both create and execute a post surgery pilates program to aid in my recovery. The primary goal of the work was to regain upper body mobility, flexibility and then rebuild strength. This 12 week case study is split up into two stages which coincide with the surgeries. Stage one began 8 weeks after the double mastectomy and focuses on regaining flexibility and mobility through the upper body. Stage two began 4 weeks after the expander to implant exchange, and focuses on maintaining upper body mobility and building strength. There was a four week break between stage one and two to allow time to recover from the second surgery. Hide description »

One of the most fascinating joints in the body is the shoulder joint. Not only does it keep the upper arm in place, but it allows the arm to perform many functions while giving it the freedom to move in a variety of ways. However, with that extensive range of motion the shoulder is more vulnerable to instability and, as such, can be prone to injury. That could explain why one of the most common physical complaints is shoulder pain. While it can be difficult to determine the exact cause of shoulder pain, some of the more common triggers include accidents, repetitive overuse, and even sleeping habits. For as long as I can remember, I have suffered from severe pain stemming from my right shoulder, down my arm and to my finger tips. In the last year, the pain was aggravated by a couple of slips and falls that I neglected to treat as I had already visited several physiotherapists over the years and my pain was never resolved. During the same period, I started my BASI pilates teacher training and, for the first time, felt an improvement in my shoulder. This paper, based on my personal experience, will discuss how pilates, and in particular the BASI block system, helped me learn to both stabilize and strengthen my shoulder joint, which proved as beneficial to my recovery as any treatments I received from physiotherapists. Hide description »

Cycling is one of the fastest growing activities in many areas of the world. Over the last 5 years regular cycling has increased by over 200,000 participants on average in the UK (british cycling 2017.) this increase in participation has led to a greater understanding of the both the benefits and the risks of cycling. Cyclists tend to ride with a lumbar flexion, which means losing the natural lumbar lordotic curve position of the lower back. This comes from being hunched forward over the handle bars and excessive repetitive pedaling which leads to overworking hip flexors, hamstrings and calf muscles causing misalignment in the pelvis and knee. Over time, poor movement patterns are developed which lead to poor posture and pain. Pilates can improve athletic performance by targeting particular areas such as tight hip flexors or weak gluteus. Pilates is a low impact form of supportive training that can bridge the gap between endurance cycling and everyday life. It therefore helps to correct postural instabilities caused by cycling returning the body to its natural state. Pilates focuses on quality of movement, not quantity, and dramatically reduces the chances of injury, something that makes it accessible to all levels of fitness. Hide description »

Cycling is one of the fastest growing activities in many areas of the world. Over the last 5 years regular cycling has increased by over 200,000 participants on average in the UK (british cycling 2017.) this increase in participation has led to a greater understanding of the both the benefits and the risks of cycling. Cyclists tend to ride with a lumbar flexion, which means losing the natural lumbar lordotic curve position of the lower back. This comes from being hunched forward over the handle bars and excessive repetitive pedaling which leads to overworking hip flexors, hamstrings and calf muscles causing misalignment in the pelvis and knee. Over time, poor movement patterns are developed which lead to poor posture and pain. Pilates can improve athletic performance by targeting particular areas such as tight hip flexors or weak gluteus. Pilates is a low impact form of supportive training that can bridge the gap between endurance cycling and everyday life. It therefore helps to correct postural instabilities caused by cycling returning the body to its natural state. Pilates focuses on quality of movement, not quantity, and dramatically reduces the chances of injury, something that makes it accessible to all levels of fitness. Hide description »

The term chronic refers to a medicine or condition lasting 3 months or more. The number of patients with 3 or more chronic illness or non – communicable diseases (ncds) in south africa is on the rise and it is predicted that by 2020 NCD’s will account for 70% of the disease burden in developing countries. The top NCD or chronic conditions include various cardiovascular and pulmonary diseases, cancers and diabetes. Much research has been carried out into the side effects of chronic medications, however, majority of patients risk these to prevent more serious conditions from developing. Often these very often painful side effects will manifest, with patients unable to rid themselves of the symptoms without potentially contraindicating the prescribed medication they are taking. I hope to highlight the effects of chronic medications and by focusing on the fundamental principles, show how pilates can benefit long term medication users and alleviate symptoms of painful side effects by building core strength, increasing muscular stability, improving posture, restoring balance and creating awareness of the body and mind as a whole. Hide description »

Diastasis means separation and recti identifies the muscle structure that’s injured. Taken together, diastasis recti describes a musculoskeletal injury where the rectus abdominus separates from the linea alba — the fibrous structure that runs down the midline of the abdomen from the xiphoid process to the pubic symphysis. This separation can be caused by the abdominal pressures of pregnancy, poor postural alignment (rib shearing and pelvic tucking) and/or obesity. Most common in post-partum women where age and number of pregnancies can increase susceptibility, it also occurs in nulliparous women, middle aged or older men and newborns. Abdominal separation generally heals on its own, but, in many cases, the condition can persist.

Besides the distinctive bulging belly, abdominal separation can cause a number of issues including weak core muscles, pelvic and lower back pain, pelvic floor dysfunction such as urinary incontinence, leakage, constipation, or prolapsed organs, and breathing issues. Larger, more serious, separations can lead to hernias requiring surgical intervention. Pilates is an excellent method to help safely address the whole body issues of poor alignment and imbalances that can contribute to or be aggravated by diastasis recti. Hide description »