What bike(s) are you actually riding page 10 gt-rider motorcycle forums dolor lumbar embarazo

Due to a lengthy landscaping and house construction project, the garage has been bereft of a ‘proper’ bike for the past 2 years… and I could not bear to ride the wife’s Honda Click, it’s so flimsy that it scares the daylights out of me! During this exile, I’ve discovered that there are few things worse than thinking like a motorcyclist whilst being trapped behind the wheel of an elderly, horsepower-deprived 3.0 Hilux Sportrider…

The inability to overtake on even the most imperceptible incline does however give one plenty of time to ponder on the sort of bike one would ride, when one could finally justify ownership of a new bike… I’ve always liked cruisers and have variously owned an 1100 cc Shadow, a Vulcan 900 and 400, even a Phantom 200 a decade ago when choices were very, very limited in Thailand. The expanding range of "retro-modern" bikes has captured my interest over the past couple of years, and I was leaning towards close scrutiny of a Royal Enfield Classic 500 as a strong contender. Whilst in Mae Sot on a border crossing mission a couple of years ago, I was very impressed by a large group of Royal Enfield bikes heading into Myanmar on a tour. That was the first time I’d ever seen one! The only reason I decided dolor lumbar derecho rinon against the Royal Enfield 500 was the modest 27 horsepower, and thinking that I might be doomed to remain stuck forever behind the cabbage trucks – but on 2 wheels instead of 4.

The new Royal Enfield 650 Interceptor looks gorgeous and is likely to be in my price range, but it is at least a year away… Suzuki finally have their new Boulevard available, but the price is a little steep. The Kawasaki Vulcan 650 is nowhere near as aesthetically pleasing as a the Vulcan Custom 900, and the Honda CTX 700 has similar chunky lines… And then, a few weeks ago, I was in Chiang Mai, heading to the Peera Pharmacy near Thapae Gate. I usually get a park down the back of Big Wing Honda, and get a coffee at the Black Canyon nearby. As I walked past the Honda workshop entrance I spotted a model I’d never seen before – a neat little Honda cruiser with decent lines! The Honda Rebel CMX 500…

The last bike I owned was a CBX 500, and although its not the style I’d normally opt for, its price and performance made it an attractive package and I really enjoyed riding it. The fact that the Rebel CMX 500 is based on the same engine, albeit engineered to produce more torque, was a good selling point.

So, a month later the Rebel is well past the 1,000 kms initial service, and has now been suitably attired in the essential bling. Actually, I opted for the slightly more expensive "enhanced" version which comes with straight handle bars, engine guard / crash-bars, stainless trim on radiator etc, and front foot-boards instead of pegs. On top of that, I’ve acquired saddlebags from contractura muscular lumbar Pat & Marty at CRSaddlebags.com, saddlebag racks, plus a windscreen and a custom seat from Zeed Parts in Bangkok. The spotlights are fitted on the crash bars but are not yet wired up, and there’s an air horn in the mail.

At this point, I am very happy with the way the bike performs. The low centre of gravity and impressive lean angles, coupled with light weight, make it a delight to ride on the twisty back roads of Mae Hong Son province… It is low enough that when stopping at the city traffic lights, I can plant both boots flat on the ground while seated. That’s a great comfort when the streets are slick in midsummer…

Due to a lengthy landscaping and house construction project, the garage has been bereft of a ‘proper’ bike for the past 2 years… and I could not bear to ride the wife’s Honda Click, it’s so flimsy that it scares the daylights out of me! During this exile, I’ve discovered that there are few things worse than thinking like a motorcyclist whilst being trapped behind the wheel of an elderly, horsepower-deprived 3.0 Hilux Sportrider…

The inability to overtake on even the most imperceptible incline does however give one plenty of time to ponder on the sort of bike one would ride, when one could finally justify ownership of a new bike… I’ve always liked cruisers and have variously owned an 1100 cc Shadow, a Vulcan 900 and 400, even a Phantom 200 a decade ago when choices were very, very limited in Thailand. The expanding range of "retro-modern" bikes has captured my interest over the past couple of years, and I was leaning towards close scrutiny of a Royal Enfield Classic 500 as a strong contender. Whilst in Mae Sot on a border crossing mission a couple of years ago, I was very impressed by a large group of Royal Enfield bikes heading into Myanmar on a tour. That was the first time I’d ever seen one! The only reason I decided against the Royal Enfield 500 was the modest 27 horsepower, and thinking that I might be doomed to remain stuck forever behind the cabbage trucks – but on 2 wheels instead of 4.

The new Royal Enfield 650 Interceptor looks gorgeous and is likely to be in my price range, but it is at least a year away… Suzuki finally have their new Boulevard available, but the price is a little steep. The Kawasaki Vulcan 650 is nowhere near as aesthetically pleasing as a the Vulcan Custom 900, and the Honda CTX 700 has similar contractura lumbar ejercicios chunky lines… And then, a few weeks ago, I was in Chiang Mai, heading to the Peera Pharmacy near Thapae Gate. I usually get a park down the back of Big Wing Honda, and get a coffee at the Black Canyon nearby. As I walked past the Honda workshop entrance I spotted a model I’d never seen before – a neat little Honda cruiser with decent lines! The Honda Rebel CMX 500…

The last bike I owned was a CBX 500 escoliosis derecha, and although its not the style I’d normally opt for, its price and performance made it an attractive package and I really enjoyed riding it. The fact that the Rebel CMX 500 is based on the same engine, albeit engineered to produce more torque, was a good selling point.

So, a month later the Rebel is well past the 1,000 kms initial service, and has now been suitably attired in the essential bling. Actually, I opted for the slightly more expensive "enhanced" version which comes with straight handle bars, engine guard / crash-bars, stainless trim on radiator etc, and front foot-boards instead of pegs. On top of that, I’ve acquired saddlebags from Pat & Marty at CRSaddlebags.com, saddlebag racks, plus a windscreen and a custom seat from Zeed Parts in Bangkok. The spotlights are fitted on the crash bars but are not yet wired up, and there’s an air horn in the mail.

At this point, I am very happy with the way the bike performs. The low centre of gravity and impressive lean angles, coupled with light weight, make it a delight to ride on the twisty back roads of Mae Hong Son province… It is low enough that when stopping at the city traffic lights, I can plant both boots flat on the ground while seated. That’s a great comfort when the streets are slick in midsummer…

The bike has been great so far. I’ve done 2500km on it and I’m still very happy with it. At first i was a bit apprehensive about buying one since all the problems with the BS3 version but the one sold here is a BS4 with fuel injection. I get about 35km/l and usually i can go around 350-400 easily on a tank.

Sure it’s not a powerhouse (27hp and 24nm torque if I’m correct) and it’s not lighting fast but it has substantial torque to do any climbing and the 21/17 front rear wheels make it very capable off road. I just took it up phu toei national park and it didn’t stall once on me despite the mud and ruts. In low rpm it just kept chugging up the hill.

On the tarmac it keeps up with other traffic well. I don’t drive that fast in Thailand but you can easily stay ahead of traffic. Top speed i around 130-135 or so. It will easily cruise at around 110km/hr. I find riding highways not a problem with the himalayan here. It just depends on how you ride i guess. Vibrations are minimal compared to the bullet and gt since it’s a long stroke and it has a counter balancer.

The seat is quite good and I’m 6"4 and have no issues sitting or standing on the bike. I usually do long trips of around 500+ km and I’ve had no issues yet with the seat or anything. I did buy one of these cooling mesh nets that you can put over the seat which helps in keeping the seat cool. It’s oil/aircooled after all . In the end I might buy some bar risers though. I ride a lot two up and that’s never really impacted performance much.

No problems so far and I don’t suspect any either since the majority of initial problems have been weeded out on the BS3 version. It’s a very basic bike, sturdy built and it does exactly what you expect for the specs/price ratio. Let me know if you have any other questions.

The bike has been great so far. I’ve done escoliosis lumbar levoconvexa 2500km on it and I’m still very happy with it. At first i was a bit apprehensive about buying one since all the problems with the BS3 version but the one sold here is a BS4 with fuel injection. I get about 35km/l and usually i can go around 350-400 easily on a tank.

Sure it’s not a powerhouse (27hp and 24nm torque if I’m correct) and it’s not lighting fast but it has substantial torque to do any climbing and the 21/17 front rear wheels make it very capable off road. I just took rotoescoliosis lumbar izquierda it up phu toei national park and it didn’t stall once on me despite the mud and ruts. In low rpm it just kept chugging up the hill.

On the tarmac it keeps up with other traffic well. I don’t drive that fast in Thailand but you can easily stay ahead of traffic. Top speed i around 130-135 or so. It will easily cruise at around 110km/hr. I find riding highways not a problem with the himalayan here. It just depends on how you ride i guess. Vibrations are minimal compared to the bullet and gt since it’s a long stroke and it has a counter balancer.

The seat is quite good and I’m 6"4 and have no issues sitting or standing on the bike. I usually do long trips of around 500+ km and I’ve had no issues yet with the seat or anything. I did buy one of these cooling mesh nets that you can put over the seat which helps in keeping the seat cool. It’s oil/aircooled after all . In the end I might buy some bar risers though. I ride a lot two up and that’s never really impacted performance much.

No problems so far and I don’t suspect any either since the majority of initial problems have been weeded out on the BS3 version. It’s a very basic bike, sturdy built and it does exactly what you expect for the specs/price ratio. Let me know if you have any other questions.

Click to expand…Thanks for sharing the experiences and thought about the Himalayan Fritz. I have a Honda Crf 250L in Thailand and I am thinking about an upgrade and possibly a Himalayan. Love the Camo colored one! Or I might also keep the Crf and add another bike. The Crf is a great bike for what it is. It suits most of the roads in Thailand well except for the highways of course. Economical and reliable too. But for long highway days and when the gf wants to join in, its not the best option. Even though we rode Hua Hin to Lampang in one day (825 kms or so via Suphanburi) on the Crf.

Wow – 35 kms/l, thats great fuel milage and even better than my Crf which gets 33,3 kms/l or so riding 90-95 kms/h clock speed but since the Crf speedo is 7 % optimistic the real speed is around 87-88 I guess. I dont want to ride the little Crf any faster over time as I think I will wear out the engine prematurely. If I could do 100 kms/h I would be happy and you say 110 is ok on the Himalayan I should be more than happy with that.

Thanks for sharing the experiences and thought about the Himalayan Fritz. I have a Honda Crf 250L in Thailand and I am thinking about an upgrade and possibly a Himalayan. Love the Camo colored one! Or I might also keep the Crf and add another bike. The Crf is a great rx de columna lumbar normal bike for what it is. It suits most of the roads in Thailand well except for the highways of course. Economical and reliable too. But for long highway days and when the gf wants to join in, its not the best option. Even though we rode Hua Hin to Lampang in one day (825 kms or so via Suphanburi) on the Crf.

Wow – 35 kms/l, thats great fuel milage and even better than my Crf which gets 33,3 kms/l or so riding 90-95 kms/h clock speed but since the hernia de disco lumbar pdf Crf speedo is 7 % optimistic the real speed is around 87-88 I guess. I dont want to ride the little Crf any faster over time as I think I will wear out the engine prematurely. If I could do 100 kms/h I would be happy and you say 110 is ok on the Himalayan I should be more than happy with that.

That’s interesting, I’m looking at a CRF250L to buy as an addition. I don’t like riding two up and my SO doesn’t have a bike yet so I guess it’s a good excuse. I love those bikes and I assume they’ll allow a bit more aggressive off roading. I don’t mind taking the Himalayan on trails but I just think the CRF will do it a lot better (and lighter). Was looking at buying one second hand perhaps.

The himalayan sleet (the camo one) looks quite nice indeed. I went for the black one in the end. As far as the brakes go… they’re not that bad. Just give it a good squeeze and they’ll bite. The rear brake is a tad bit touchy and locks up easily going downhill, on tarmac it’s fine though. That’s the only complaint I have about it but I probably just need to adjust the lever. In the beginning, the front brake was a bit sluggish / soft but it’s actually improved over the last 1500 km. Regarding the suspension, I’m not sure if it’s soft or not. The rear suspension is a tad bit hard at times and I’m bouncing all over the seat doing a 100km/hr on secondary roads with rough patches; it’s quite firm. Front is soft, but it’s intended that way to cater for off road / Indian roads I think. The bike is hugely popular in India.

The maintenance schedule is quite odd indeed but I checked with RE in Bangkok and they said the 5,000km valve check is for the first time, after that it’s 10,000km I believe. I can check with the maintenance schedule but it’s a bit over the top.